Tag Archives: a day to remember

LIVE SHOTS Self Help Fest 2017, Philadelphia, PA

All photos by Taylor Markarian

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EXCLUSIVE: Acaedia Premiere New Single “Risktaker”

Photo Credit: Andres Aponte (AndyOceans Photography)

Miami-based metalcore band Acaedia have partnered with us to bring you their newest single, “Risktaker”! Following their previous EP, Dawning, “Risktaker” is a standalone single to keep fans hyped as they work on writing a new EP for 2017. The new song was mixed and mastered by Andrew Wade (A Day To Remember, Wage War, Neck Deep), and if this is the first you’re hearing of these guys, you’ll definitely want to hear more after this. You can also watch their music video for “Rotten” here.

A Day To Remember Announce New Record ‘Bad Vibrations,’ Stream Heavy Title Track

A Day To Remember have finally given us a release date for their new record, Bad Vibrations! The long awaited release is set to hit stores August 19th, and the pre-order is available now. It’s been a little while since they streamed their last single, “Paranoia,” so to accompany this announcement they’ve streamed the title track, which is a lot heavier than we’ve seen from ADTR in a while. Check out the video and the album artwork below and let us know what you think!

Continue reading A Day To Remember Announce New Record ‘Bad Vibrations,’ Stream Heavy Title Track

LIVE SHOTS: Rock’n Derby’s 1st Year, New York

The Rock’n Derby was a weird little festival very much off the beaten path. In Schaghticoke, NY, bands from Stray From The Path, to Halestorm, to A Day To Remember gave performances on Saturday, May 21st–just one of the three days of the event. Nestled in rural New York, the festival featured not only bands, however, but wrestling and demolition derby. It also featured some not so cool things, like a surprising number of Confederate flags, only further proving my personal theory that if you drive far enough north (or in any direction, really) you eventually hit The South. 

Check out some shots we got from this one-of-a-kind festival. Banged-up cars, face-painted wrestlers, and Levi Benton? Yup. All here.

Continue reading LIVE SHOTS: Rock’n Derby’s 1st Year, New York

VIDEO PREMIERE: A Day To Remember “Paranoia”

A Day To Remember is one of the few bands that remains impressive as the years go on and the record sales go up. Releasing their new material through their very own ADTR Records, they stay true to themselves and their sound and yet still move forward. Their new single, “Paranoia,” proves it beyond a shadow of a doubt. The only thing that would’ve made this video better is if the ADTR dudes transformed into actual superheroes. But given the split second AP comic book cover shown at around 1:10, maybe they’re saving the tights and the capes for the next video.

Bring Me The Horizon: The Latest Face of Wheaties?

bmth_throne

A very wise man once said, “I spent my high school career spit on and shoved to agree/so I could watch all my heroes sell a car on T.V.”

For almost 10 years these words sung by Gerard Way in My Chemical Romance‘s 2006 track “Disenchanted” have rung in my ears.  At first I thought I was so attracted to these lyrics because they were the words of my hero telling me how life gets disappointing as you grow up.  It’s emo, and a fact we hear constantly as we get older, but I took it to be more of a thematic message, rather than a literal one.  Who knew that by 2013 I’d watch my hero allow my favorite band to break up in order to actually sell his own botched image of David Bowie-meets-David Byrne not only on T.V., but on billboards and bus stop benches like some forgettable basketball player on a box of Wheaties. To me, Gerard Way, like so many artists before and after him, had sold out. And now, in a post-My Chem world, I am forced to sit back and watch the rest of my musical heroes follow suit.

When it comes to selling out one must ask two things: First, what exactly is selling out? And second, who actually does sell out?

Selling out is a common idiomatic pejorative expression for the compromising of a person’s integrity, morality, authenticity, or principles in exchange for personal gain, such as money. —Wikipedia

Selling Out: To compromise one’s values and/or aristic [sic] vision in order to gain fame and/or monetary profit. Commonplace in today’s musical society. It is rare to find a successful musical artist who has not “sold out”, however, this is not to say that they do not exist. —-Urban Dictionary

Sell Out: To betray one’s cause or associates especially for personal gain—Merriam-Webster

As many of you may have heard, it was recently announced that the deathcore-turned-alternative-rock band, Bring Me The Horizon has left the independent punk label Epitaph and signed to Columbia Records, a major corporation of a music label. By the definitions above–having altered their sound to reach a wider audience and appeal more to the levels of rock being released today while leaving their small time, more avant garde sound in order to do so– BMTH have seemingly sold out.

With the release of their upcoming record’s first single “Happy Song,” fans can see that the transition from deathcore found on staples such as Suicide Season and There Is A Hell… is no longer rooted in the same artful direction as their clean vocal heavy Sempiternal. It is now almost exclusively pop rock with an accented aggression on several musical notes. Gone are the days of frontman Oli Sykes screaming “Crucify me!” and in place are those of him melodically encouraging us to “sing a happy song,” because sometimes rainbows and butterflies make your day much better than well thought out religious imagery used ironically in songwriting.

Okay, so maybe I’m a little biased. However, the proof is in the pudding. With the release of (what is technically considered) the first purchasable single off of the upcoming record, old school fans were even more blasted by the change of BMTH’s direction with”Throne.” Though it upholds strong connotations image-wise to their deathcore days, it is almost a direct rip off of mid-2000s Linkin Park. With accented screams, electronica highlights, and catchy, melodic vocals, metalcore fans were left in the dark and feeling almost betrayed by BMTH.

Sure, many bands “evolve” or “mature” and change up their sound, but it seems as if the introduction of keyboardist Jordan Fish is what really did BMTH in.  Though his efforts greatly helped bring BMTH out of their shell on 2013’s Sempiternal, his continued presence in the press when concerning this record is rather alarming. Rolling Stone labels him as the “keyboardist and primary songwriter” in their latest and only article ever concerned with BMTH, ineptly (yet maybe appropriately) titled “Ditching Metalcore.”  As Fish upholds himself as the voice of BMTH after his work with the band for only one released full-length, it becomes worrisome. Oli Sykes has not been present for the majority of interviews since the release of “Happy Song.”  So, is Jordan Fish taking over the band and corrupting it into a commercialized redundancy of old school alternative rock or is this actually Sykes agreeing to sell out and abandon all that he stood for previously?

But it’s not necessarily fair to blame Bring Me The Horizon for selling out.  We cannot blame a band for going against all that they were when we, the public and music consumers, are the ones who potentially could have forced them into the environment that led them down this path. With a decline in record sales and the need for radio-publicity to spark interest in artists, major labels can expand the horizons (no pun intended) for a band confined to the minute exposure and monetary limitations of an independent label. This generation’s need to consume music for as cheap (or sometimes as free of cost) as possible is what is deteriorating musicians’ abilities to live through their work on smaller labels. But is it worth an artist’s musical integrity? Let’s look at some examples.

Exhibit A: Fall Out Boy.

For many, Fall Out Boy is the poster child of modern day “punk” or “alternative” selling out.  But when exactly did they get flack? Somewhere in between the release of their chart topping full-length From Under The Cork Tree and the release of “Take Over, The Break’s Over,” a fun single off of their follow up Infinity On High where they call out all of their haters. People were angry at the guys in FOB for at the time signing to a label like Island Records (a sub-label of Universal Music Group).  Though in retrospect, it is safe to say that while fans may have been disappointed with their signing to a major label and slight departure from their original underground sound, they still remained in the vein of the sonic aesthetic presented on the lesser known Take This To Your Grave.  Even while boosting their careers on major labels, it wasn’t until their latest record American Beauty/American Psycho  came out that they truly departed from all forms of rock or punk in favor of commercial pop.  As of right now, it took them their entire musical career (and a four year hiatus) to actually sell out artistically.

Exhibit B: Breathe Carolina

Not really punk or hardcore, but still relevant. Breathe Carolina left their minor label in order to sign to *DING DING DING* Columbia Records, just like Bring Me did.  Now, how did that work out?  After one album, Hell Is What You Make It, the electro-duo had a top radio hit with “Blackout” and a self-proclaimed total loss of creative freedom.  Eventually they would depart early from the label to return to a minor league with Fearless Records and even lose founding member Kyle Even.  The sole remaining member, David Schmitt, luckily just decided to grab a backing band and continue on his own with the release of the highly successful record, in both the alternative and EDM scenes, Savages.

So what is it about Columbia Records that was so daunting?  Why haven’t bands like PVRIS or A Day To Remember chosen to find major labels when their sounds are actually marketable to the mainstream?  PVRIS purposely chose to sign to the metalcore label Rise Records, even though they are a pop-synth trio.  A Day To Remember opted to self-release their latest record Common Courtesy rather than be tied to or bought out by any label, even though half of their careers they have gotten flack for “selling out” despite remaining decently in the underground. Why can All Time Low‘s hit singles and chart-topping records go platinum while they perpetually remain on Hopeless Records? There is an element to selling out rooted in the very base definitions above, but there is also a more personal element of selling out that rests on whether you compromise the artistic integrity of your music in order to gain a profit. Whether Bring Me The Horizon will entirely sell out is still yet to be determined, though unfortunately it seems that with “Throne” and “Happy Song” the band that I loved for being so harsh and out of the box will now be known to the general public alongside old Muse tracks and new Arctic Monkeys on top rock radio. But only time will tell.

Record Review: August Burns Red ‘Found In Far Away Places’

abr found in far away places

The seventh studio album, Found in Far Away Places, from Pennsylvanian Christian metal band August Burns Red is their first on Fearless Records. It is a brutal yet sometimes hopeful twelve-song trek through faith, anger and other trying emotions, with melodic respites in between.

Found in Far Away Places begins with “The Wake,” the album’s first single, and it’s exactly what ABR fans have come to expect–loud, crushing instrumentals with deep, unforgiving vocals. Humanity’s greed and indifference to the world’s problems are, as usual, the focal point of ABR’s aural assault. Following “The Wake” is the accusatory “Martyr.” The ascent through brutality and anger continues and then, near the halfway mark, the listener gets a moment to catch a breath with an unexpected brief but beautiful guitar solo.

This record has more instrumental breaks than August Burns Red’s previous works. “Separating The Seas” has an interlude (weirdly similar to “Hava Nagila”) which serves as a bridge between two points of the usual ABR aggression. Almost every track on this album contains a melodic, relatively quiet bridge or interlude, and they tend to take the songs in an unexpected direction. The western interlude in “Identity” is yet another twist.  

A Day to Remember’s Jeremy McKinnon delivers clean vocals on “Ghosts,” reminding the listener to “Just look at the world around you/There’s a consequence for what we do.” Then the album avalanches down through confusion, anger, redemption, and even hope. There is hope in “Everlasting Ending,” but “Broken Promises” and “Blackwood” return to the palpable violent anger of the opening tracks. The album ends almost entirely in opposition to how it begins with “Marathon” and its last sentiment: “I will climb this mountain to find you/I will search far and wide/I will climb this mountain to find you before running out of time.”

The first words out of Jake Luhr’s mouth in “The Wake” are “Destroy everything.” The final words on the record are humble and hopeful. Found in Far Away Places demands to be listened to carefully in order to fully appreciate the scope of the emotions and themes it encompasses. There is no doubt that with each listen there will be more to discover, and whether or not you believe in a higher power, August Burns Red might just help you see hope for all of us.

By David Marulanda 

Four Star Rating

August Burns Red Drops New Single (feat. Jeremy McKinnon)

ABR Ghosts

There’s been a large build up in anticipation for August Burns Red‘s newest album, Found In Far Away Places. Even though the album doesn’t come out for a few more days, ABR fans can check out a bunch of the new singles right now! Their latest release, being the ever melodic “Ghosts,” features a nice vocal cameo from the voice of A Day To Remember, Jeremy McKinnon.  McKinnon helps give the harsh yet oh so lovable edge that ABR is known for a bit of a twist, so check out the single for “Ghosts” below and get ready for the full album drop on 6/30/15!

Live Streaming and Hardcore: Match or Misfire?

yahoo live vans warped tour wcar

On June 19th, Yahoo! Screen streamed the first date of Vans Warped Tour 2015 on its Live Nation Channel from the Fairplex in Pomona, CA. The live stream kicks off a hugely important festival for the “underground,” but it also kicks off an important question: Do live concert streaming and hard rock shows really belong together?

We’re all used to seeing live performances on TV by now. Come the Super Bowl, the halftime show is all that matters for many viewers. We watch televised performances from the likes of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, The Oscars, and nightly programs like Jimmy Kimmel Live and Conan. While broadcasted musical events have become commonplace, live concert streaming takes the concept to a next level and thus raises next level questions. When a -core band’s show inside a local venue becomes easily viewable from remote locations, is it just cool or does it take something away? When you can watch Stick To Your Guns play a set from your laptop in bed with some hot cocoa, for example, it inarguably changes the experience. But is it for the better?

Vans Warped Tour and Stick To Your Guns aren’t the only examples of streamed shows, of course, and Yahoo! isn’t the only platform for this market. (Others include IROCKE and ConcertTV & Concert Window, for instance). Various acts from genres all across the board have dabbled in the new digital music phenomenon. Bands like The Ghost Inside, Falling In Reverse, Chelsea Grin, August Burns Red, and Bayside have live streamed their shows via Yahoo!, as have acts like Stone Temple Pilots, Infected Mushroom and Meghan Trainor. On one hand, you might note how fair the platform is to music of all types. Heavy bands aren’t usually deemed noteworthy enough to appear side-by-side with ultra-famous pop singers or widely-known psychedelic trance groups. Alternatively, though it may be nice to see your favorite bands emerge from the more shadowy corners of the music world, there is something about watching their performances from a computer screen that can justifiably raise an eyebrow or two.

yahoo live past shows

I’ll admit, the first time I heard about live concert streaming, I thought it was pretty freakin’ awesome. “No way!” was followed by “I’ve gotta try that!” was followed by “I’m totally living in the future right now!” I actually tuned in to a couple of shows to see what it was like or to see how the bands actually performed live. Each time, I stared at my computer screen allowing that exact same train of thought to pass through my brain…for about 60 seconds. Then I got over it.

Then I started thinking, That’s cool. I’m sure the people who are actually there right now are having fun. Because although being able to watch a live show from your couch is admittedly a neat trick, the initial magic wears off rather quickly. Sure, with pop acts and more mainstream sounds it’s probably a bit different. After all, watching Super Bowl Halftime shows is always fun. But pop, hip-hop, and stadium rock acts are what the doorman of Oz would call a horse of a different color as compared to a hardcore outfit. Those streamline genres are more tailored to broadcast performances. For the most part, vocals are really most of what’s going on in a pop act, and the audio engineers are well-adjusted to those kinds of smooth vocals. But introduce some screaming and growling into the mic, some double bass pedals alongside intense cymbal work, and some crunchy guitars and most live music coming from your home speakers sounds crappy. Even though the actual live show at the venue could be insane, a live hardcore band will never sound as good over your internet connection as it will in person. As it always has with this kind of music, it comes down to the live show, and the thing about live shows is you should probably be there when they happen.

A Hardcore Crowd at NYC's Gramcery Theatre
A Hardcore Crowd at NYC’s Gramcery Theatre

Half of hardcore is the live performance. The recorded tracks are what get you interested perhaps, and they’re definitely what keep you going, but the live show is what it’s all about: being between a certain set of a walls with a certain set of people playing your favorite set of tunes. You go to your favorite venue with familiar graffiti impetuously scribbled on the walls. You stand in a crowd of 50, 100, 500 people wearing shirts of bands you’ll be seeing next month or whose CD you have laying around your car. You get pushed around, jump up and down, thrown front to back, toppled, drowned in the sweat of strangers, get a beer spilled on you, and get close enough to the band that the spit as their screaming flies past your eyelids. To use precise terms, there’s a vibe, an energy you get from the sense of community and from the charisma of the musicians striking chords you’ve heard alone in your room a thousand times. You go to a show to not be alone in your room anymore. You go to a hardcore show because there’s nothing like being at a hardcore show.

True, live streaming can allow you to virtually attend a show you otherwise might not have been able to attend. Boiler Room streams music events from all around the world, making it possible for someone who lives in New York City to “attend” a concert in London. Live streaming also may introduce you to new bands before you decide you want to spend your money on a ticket. However, you don’t get an accurate depiction of what the band in question is actually like because you’re not physically in the space, and you could end up hating a band you might have otherwise loved.

Am I standing atop a hill with a torch in one hand and a mace in the other shouting, “Down with the internet!”? No. Is live concert streaming a terrible development in technology? By no means. However, does it make sense for genres that have historically and culturally found a home in dingy basements and mosh pits? Not in my book.