Tag Archives: ronnie radke

LIVE SHOTS Self Help Fest 2017, Philadelphia, PA

All photos by Taylor Markarian

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The End Is Here Tour Hits The Fillmore at Philly

It’s still early in 2017, but The End Is Here Tour may very well be the biggest tour of the year. Giants in the scene like Falling In Reverse, Motionless In White and Issues play to crowds of thousands with stage production that would rival the best Hollywood sets. And on a massive tour like this, openers Dangerkids and Dead Girls Academy start each show off with a bang. Check out the insane spectacle at Philly’s The Fillmore with these incredible shots.

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The Animal In Me Takes On Eminem’s “Rap God”

rap god
Fusing rap and metalcore has become something of a phenomenon over the last few years.  MGK has been featured on Sleeping With Sirens‘ tracks, Ronnie Radke makes cameos in B. Lay‘s songs, and Punk Goes Crunk was strangely an entire album.  Now, the metalcore outfit The Animal In Me has taken on turning Eminem‘s iconic comeback track “Rap God” into a djent-filled epic.

I’m not going to lie, when I saw that this band, known and lauded for their fantastic covers, was planning on attempting to cover “Rap God” I was extremely skeptical.  However, after the first 30 seconds, I was sold. Check out the video below and let us know what you think of this unique spin on Eminem’s infamous “tongue-in-cheek fuck you.”

10 Things You Do Pre-Show

If you’re a regular show-goer, you know all of these apply to you. Don’t deny it. Just embrace it. LET’S GOOOOOO!!

1. You and your friends find out your fave band is going on tour and coming to your city.

2. You bought your tickets. OMG.

3. The show is tonight and you may or may not be freaking out. 

4. Time to get fresh as fuck.

5. Throw on that leather jacket.

6. Put that eyeliner on.

7. Where did I put my ticket again?

8. Even after years of going to shows, you still don’t know where to put your wallet so it won’t fall out. 

 9. But you know exactly where to put your keys. 

10. You down that Red Bull or Monster Energy Drink like it’s your job. 

And when you finally get to the venue, your body is ready. Let’s do this.

Did we miss anything? Let us know what YOU do pre-show! 

Bare Meaning: The Role of Women in Music Culture

Photo taken from Pinterest
Photo taken from Pinterest

There has been increasing talk of the lack of women in the hardcore scene lately. Yet for all the talk, there doesn’t seem to be adequate exploration of why this is so or of what’s truly going on here. Relative to other rock genres like metal and alternative, hardcore seems to be the most homogenous and male-dominated of all. The reasons for this phenomenon may be far and wide, but I’d like to point to one particular issue that I’ve noticed in my years of listening to post-hardcore–the lyrics.

YouTuber Jared Dines hilariously sums it up in one of his satirical videos of the scene, “10 Styles of Metal.” A few seconds into the video, when the genre title “POST HARDCORE” holds above his head, Dines elucidates in unclean vocals: “My girlfriend broke up with me/ I’m really upset about it/ It’s really my own fault/ But I’m gonna blame her.” While saying that all post-hardcore bands sport the same lyrical content is an overgeneralization, any fan can laugh at how common and, for the most part, accurate Dines’ criticism actually is. Women tend to be given a certain symbolic status of vixen or betrayer or, like in a recent Ice Nine Kills music video, succubus.

Personally, I love the music metalcore band Ice Nine Kills make, but I’ve got to admit that the video for “The Fastest Way To A Girl’s Heart Is Through Her Ribcage” is troubling. It’s become so commonplace now that we no longer realize it, or if we do, we let it pass by us as mere fact–the idea that woman is the downfall of man. In this particular case, a (sexually) voracious female demon that we watch vocalist Spencer Charnas brutally kill is the subject matter. Coupled with lyrics like “You’d be just as sexy bleeding,” this visual takes the trope to a more obvious extreme. While some of you out there may argue “it’s just a music video” or “you’re taking this too seriously,” I’d like to suggest that sometimes the effects outweigh the intent. Do most guys approach their actions or the art they make with the explicit idea that they’re going to villainize women? I’d like to guess not. But the unconscious ideas are there and they keep getting nonchalantly perpetuated, and in this instance, as an INK fan, become alienating to me.

From_Death_to_Destiny

Perhaps the very icon for this kind of behavior is British powerhouse Asking Alexandria; or, to get right down to it, ex-frontman Danny Worsnop. The cover art for the band’s latest album From Death To Destiny is a prime example of the female figure being reduced to a purely sexual and symbolic role for the male frontman. In the image (above), the woman is placed naked in a vending machine at the male rock star’s disposal should he have a few bucks on him to spare. She is a resource of pleasure for him, an object. In short, she is dehumanized. Take virtually any strand of lyrics from Asking Alexandria over the years and you’ll find something similar. Again, AA is a band I’ve enjoyed listening to musically for a while, but lyrically it’s hard to escape “I knew when I first saw you/You’d fuck like a whore” (“Not The American Average“).

On the more pop-oriented side of the post-hardcore spectrum, Falling In Reverse‘s music video for “Good Girls Bad Guys” gives us yet another example. In the video, a car pulls up and lets attractive women out of the trunk, parading them around on a kind of catwalk for the men on the set. Their only value in the space of the video is as beautiful objects; commodities that give the men their successful, masculine status. These women are only here for the purpose of reflecting the male ego back on itself in a positive light.

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This editorial isn’t here to call out anyone specifically, or even to call out men in general. “Men = bad, women = good” isn’t the idea here, and hardcore/post-hardcore/metalcore aren’t the only genres that have issues with representation of women. Rather, the purpose of this article is to call out a prevailing attitude that I think needs some reevaluation; the attitude that, to quote Laura Mulvey, “Women are bearers of meaning, not makers of meaning.”

For me, this is the link to creating a “Women of Hardcore” serial. There needs to be a shift in perspective. By collecting interviews with various female talents in the scene, we want to emphasize these people as active contributors to music and music culture, and hopefully, show other fans of hardcore–female and male–that there is a place for them, too. So let’s go make some meaning, regardless of your sexy parts.

VIDEO PREMIERE: Falling In Reverse “Just Like You”

Ronnie Radke cross-dressing

We’re all aware by now that Ronnie Radke is an asshole, and with the arrival of Falling In Reverse’s new album, Just Like You, it’s safe to say he’s not afraid of owning it. The music video for the title track of the band’s third record celebrates a fact to which those of you who have ever seen the infamous frontman perform can attest–being an asshole for some reason only adds to Radke’s entrancing charisma.

In this video directed by Zach Merck–who has directed a handful of other Radke videos dating back to the “Situations” days–the singer resumes the familiar role of the reality TV star. Here starring as a competitor (and, of course, ultimate winner of) talent contest parody “The Choice,” Radke makes it clear that if nothing else, he’s a born showman; or at the very least, that it’s worthwhile seeing him cross-dress as Jessie J. You’ll spot a few familiar faces who are, like Radke, known for their shall we say, less-than-reserved demeanors. How many (Andy) dicks can you spot in one video? (And yes, the larger-than-life phallic symbol of the microphone between Radke’s legs at the end definitely counts.)